cord blood awareness | what research is currently underway with regard to the use of cord blood stem cells

Lack of awareness is the #1 reason why cord blood is most often thrown away. For most pregnant mothers, their doctor does not even mention the topic. If a parent wants to save cord blood, they must be pro-active. ​
As with any medical procedure, there is never a 100% guarantee that banked cord blood, even if it comes from the patient being treated, will provide a successful outcome. Families can go through the entire cost of banking cord blood, including the massive first-year fee, only to find that the treatment didn’t work as intended. It is not an investment. It is more of an insurance policy.
Cord blood transplants have become much more successful since the early 2000s. Clinicians have learned how to match people better to stored cord blood. Dosing for cord blood has become more reliable. Better care for patients going through a cord blood transplant has been improved. All of those benefits become even better if the patient is able to use their own cord blood that has been properly stored.
Currently, cord blood can only treat blood and immune diseases. There is research being done into other ways of using cord blood, such as in the treatment of diabetes, Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s disease, but there is no conclusive evidence this research will lead to effective treatments.
Families expecting a new baby face hundreds of decisions that will affect their child’s future—like finding the perfect name, figuring how to manage breast or bottle feeding, childcare, and a host of other parenting decisions.
Cord blood is a source of adult stem cells similar to those contained in bone marrow. Cord blood stem cells are collected after the birth of a healthy infant, and pose no risk to the donating mother or baby. Therefore, there are no ethical issues or controversy connected with the use of these cells. This differs from controversial embryonic stem cells that require the destruction of an embryo in order to be used for research.
When you bank your child’s cord blood with ViaCord, your child will have access to stem cells that are a perfect genetic match.  Some cancers like neuroblastoma are autologous treatments. Ongoing regenerative medicine clinical trials are using a child’s own stem cells for conditions like autism and cerebral palsy. 104, 109 To date, of the 400+ families that have used their cord blood 44% were for regenerative medicine research.
For example, your child could develop a genetic medical condition for which the blood stored would no longer be useful. In these types of cases, families who paid to store cord blood were at a major disadvantage. Once their child developed an immune deficiency disease, they had to pay out of pocket for donated cord blood on top of the fees they paid storing the cord blood they can’t even use.
After your unit arrives at ViaCord’s Processing Lab, specialists will process your baby’s stem cells to maximize cell yield. They are then transferred to a transplant-ready cryobag for storage at or below ≤ -170º C (brrr). 
Our writing team consists of professionals who work with pregnant and birthing women, as well as new parents, all year round. We’re not just bloggers or journalists. We’re industry professionals who love what we do!
At present, the odds of undergoing any stem cell transplant by age 70 stands at one in 217, but with the continued advancement of cord blood and related stem and immune cell research, the likelihood of utilizing the preserved cord blood for disease treatment will continue to grow. Read more about cord blood as a regenerative medicine here.
In an allogenic transplant, another person’s stem cells are used to treat a child’s disease. This kind of transplant is more likely to be done than an autologous transplant. In an allogenic transplant, the donor can be a relative or be unrelated to the child. For an allogenic transplant to work, there has to be a good match between donor and recipient. A donor is a good match when certain things about his or her cells and the recipient’s cells are alike. If the match is not good, the recipient’s immune system may reject the donated cells. If the cells are rejected, the transplant does not work.
Luckily for expectant parents, cord blood can be easily collected at the baby’s birth via the umbilical cord with no harm to the mother or baby. This is why pregnancy is a great time to plan to collect and bank a baby’s cord blood.
Most of the diseases for which HSCT is a standard treatment are disorders of blood cell lineage. The proliferation by which blood cells are formed from stem cells is illustrated in the side graphic (click on the image to expand it); you can also read about specific cell types in the immune system in more detail. In the United States, most health insurance providers will pay for a stem cell transplant if it is a “standard therapy” for the patient’s diagnosis.
This web page was researched by Frances Verter, PhD, Alexey Bersenev, MD PhD, and Pedro Silva Couto, MSc ©2016-2018. Sources of information about established therapies were publications in the medical literature found via PubMed and Google Scholar. Sources of clinical trials were searches of ClinicalTrials.gov, Chinese Clinical Trial Registry (ChiCTR), Japan University hospital Medical Information Network Clinical Trial Registry (UMIN-CTR), Japan Medical Association Clinical Trial Registry (JMA-CTR), Clinical Research Information Service from South Korea (CRiS), EU Clinical Trials Register (EudraCT), World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP), Netherlands Trial Register (NTR), Australian New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry (ANZCTR), Clinical Trials Registry-India (CTRI), German Clinical Trials Register (DRKS), and Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials (IRCT).
Cord tissue is rich in another type of stem cell. Although there are no current uses, researchers are excited about the benefits cord tissue stem cells may offer in potential future users, such as regenerative medicine. By storing both, you’ll have potential access to more possibilities
These are diseases for which transplants of blood-forming stem cells (Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplants, HSCT) are a standard treatment. For some diseases they are the only therapy, and in other diseases they are only employed when front-line therapies have failed or the disease is very aggressive. The lists below include ALL therapies that use blood-forming stem cells, without distinction as to whether the stem cells were extracted from bone marrow, peripheral blood, or cord blood.
Cord blood banking is the process of collecting and storing your baby’s umbilical cord blood stem cells for potential medical use. ViaCord also offers parents the option to collect and store stem cells found in the tissue of the umbilical cord.  This is known as cord tissue banking. Our approach to cord blood and cord tissue banking is simple: Apply the most advanced science to deliver the highest-quality stem cell collection and storage process in order to achieve the best results for families. That approach has guided our growth and success for nearly twenty-five years.
After your baby is born, the umbilical cord and placenta are usually thrown away. Because you are choosing to donate, the blood left in the umbilical cord and placenta will be collected and tested. Cord blood that meets standards for transplant will be stored at the public cord blood bank until needed by a patient. (It is not saved for your family.)
When the medical courier delivers the cord blood collection kit to the cord blood bank, it is quickly processed to ensure the continued viability of the stem cells and immune system cells found in the cord blood. Firstly, a sample of the cord blood is tested for microbiological contamination, and the mother’s blood is tested for infectious diseases. As these tests are being conducted, the cord blood is processed to reduce the number of red blood cells and its total volume and isolate the stem cells and immune cells.





Save by paying in advance for 21 years of storage through our long-term storage plan. This plan covers all the initial fees (collection kit, courier service, processing, and preservation) and the cost of 21 years of continuous storage. A lifetime plan is also available; call for details.
Meet Dylan. Diagnosed with leukemia at just 8 weeks old, he received a life-saving cord blood transplant at 6 months old. Today, Dylan is growing up strong, going to school, travelling with his family and just having fun being a kid!
In New Zealand, a hopeful couple are participating in a study that will use one of their son’s cord blood stem cells to research treatment for another son’s cystic fibrosis. In Chicago, people are using their sibling’s stem cells to successfully treat sickle cell disease. And countless other families have banked their second child’s cord blood after their first child was diagnosed with leukemia. Many of those children are alive and well today thanks to their sibling’s stem cells. Since the first successful cord blood stem cell transplant on a sibling in 1988, over 30,000 cord blood transplants have been performed worldwide.
The stem cells in cord blood can provide numerous benefits, but they are not a magical cure for everything that may happen to a child. Certain genetic conditions, such as MD or spina bifida, cannot be treated through a child’s cord blood because the stem cells would be affected by the same condition. Other cord blood options may be available, but it is important to note that the presence of it is not a guarantee of future wellness.
Deciding on banking cord blood, either publicly or privately, is not a decision that should be made in the spur of the moment. What you decide to do with the cord blood should be part of the overall birthing plan. Let your doctor know what your preference happens to be. Coordinate with the cord blood bank so that there is less of a risk for a mistake to occur.
Donors to public banks must be screened for blood or immune system disorders or other problems. With a cord blood donation, the mother’s blood is tested for genetic disorders and infections, and the cord blood also is tested after it is collected. Once it arrives at the blood bank, the cord blood is “typed.” It is tracked by a computer so that it can be found quickly for any person who matches when needed.
## Payment Plan Disclosures for in-house CBR 12-Month Plan (interest free) – No credit check required. The 12-month plan requires a $15/month administrative fee. The plans may be prepaid in full at any time.
There are around 20 companies in the United States offering public cord blood banking and 34 companies offering private (or family) cord blood banking. Public cord blood banking is completely free (collecting, testing, processing, and storing), but private cord blood banking costs between $1,400 and $2,300 for collecting, testing, and registering, plus between $95 and $125 per year for storing. Both public and private cord blood banks require moms to be tested for various infections (like hepatitis and HIV).
You’ve just visited the doctor and the good news is that you’re going to have a baby and everything looks good. Thirty years ago, your doctor may have given you a baby book and information about products that sponsors want you to buy for your new addition. Today, along with pretty much the same materials, you’ll be asked to consider saving the blood of your newborn that’s left over in the umbilical cord and placenta after the delivery. Another big decision, and possibly a costly one.
Since 1988, cord blood transplants have been used to treat over 80 diseases in hospitals around the world. Inherited blood disorders such as sickle cell disease and thalassemia can be cured by cord blood transplant. Over the past decade, clinical trials have been developing cord blood therapies for conditions that affect brain development in early childhood, such as cerebral palsy and autism.
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Your baby’s cord blood could be a valuable resource for another family.  From foundations to non-profit blood banks and medical facilities, there are numerous locations that will collect, process, and use the stem cells from your baby’s cord blood to treat other people.
Donating cord blood to a public bank adds to the supply and can potentially help others. Donating to a public bank is especially important for ethnic minorities, who are not well represented in cord blood banks. Public cord blood donation increases the chance of all groups finding a match.
Stem cells are able to transform into other types of cells in the body to create new growth and development. They are also the building blocks of the immune system. The transformation of these cells provides doctors with a way to treat leukemia and some inherited health disorders.

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