cord blood facts | babies need their cord blood

Cord tissue is rich in another type of stem cell. Although there are no current uses, researchers are excited about the benefits cord tissue stem cells may offer in potential future users, such as regenerative medicine. By storing both, you’ll have potential access to more possibilities
Stem cells are able to transform into other types of cells in the body to create new growth and development. They are also the building blocks of the immune system. The transformation of these cells provides doctors with a way to treat leukemia and some inherited health disorders.
Tissue typed and listed on the registry of the C.W. Bill Young Cell Transplantation Program, also called the Be The Match Registry®. (The registry is a listing of potential marrow donors and donated cord blood units. When a patient needs a transplant, the registry is searched to find a matching marrow donor or cord blood unit.)
Since then, many families who suffered from a compatible disease grew hopeful for this newfound anecdote that seems to save so many lives effortlessly. This year to count there are 600,000 umbilical cord blood samples that have been stored and over 30,000 transplants performed. Cord blood can save lives, but cord blood banking may not be the right decision for you and your family. Read on to find out why.
Cord blood stem cells are involved in treating more than 80 diseases. Most often, they’re used in treatments for cancers like leukemia and lymphoma, inherited immune system and immune-cell disorders, sickle cell disease and anemia, and Gaucher disease, but they can also be helpful in treating other immune, blood and neurological disorders.
We are genetically closest to our siblings. That’s because we inherit half of our DNA from our mother and half from our father, so the genes we inherit are based on a chance combination of our parents’. Our siblings are the only other people inheriting the same DNA.
You will not be charged for any expenses resulting from the collection of your baby’s cord blood. Likewise, your insurance company will not be billed for anything associated with your donation. The St. Louis Cord Blood Bank assumes responsibility for all costs to collect, process, and store the unit for future use.
You’ve just visited the doctor and the good news is that you’re going to have a baby and everything looks good. Thirty years ago, your doctor may have given you a baby book and information about products that sponsors want you to buy for your new addition. Today, along with pretty much the same materials, you’ll be asked to consider saving the blood of your newborn that’s left over in the umbilical cord and placenta after the delivery. Another big decision, and possibly a costly one.
At present, the odds of undergoing any stem cell transplant by age 70 stands at one in 217, but with the continued advancement of cord blood and related stem and immune cell research, the likelihood of utilizing the preserved cord blood for disease treatment will continue to grow. Read more about cord blood as a regenerative medicine here.
Cord blood banking is the process of collecting and storing your baby’s umbilical cord blood stem cells for potential medical use. ViaCord also offers parents the option to collect and store stem cells found in the tissue of the umbilical cord.  This is known as cord tissue banking. Our approach to cord blood and cord tissue banking is simple: Apply the most advanced science to deliver the highest-quality stem cell collection and storage process in order to achieve the best results for families. That approach has guided our growth and success for nearly twenty-five years.
For many families, the primary reason why they choose not to store their cord blood is the overall cost of doing so. You only get one chance to store the cord blood and the cost of collection, storage, and shipping for the first year alone is often the same price as delivering the baby at the hospital. It is not uncommon for costs to be around $2,000 for the initial collection, than there is often a storage fee of over $100 per year that must also be paid.
The parents who make the decision to store their baby’s cord blood and cord tissue are thinking ahead, wanting to do right from the start (even before the start), and taking steps to do whatever they can to protect their baby down the road. Today, many conscientious parents are also considering delayed cord clamping (DCC), a practice in which the umbilical cord is not clamped immediately but rather after it continues to pulse for an average of 30 seconds to 180 seconds. Many parents don’t realize that they can delay the clamping of the cord and still bank their baby’s cord blood. As noted early, our premium processing method, PrepaCyte-CB, is able to capture more immune system cells and reduce the greatest number of red blood cell contaminants. This makes it go hand in hand with delayed cord clamping because it is not as affected by volume, effectively making up for the smaller quantity with a superior quality. You can read more about delayed cord clamping vs. cord blood banking here.
If a family is looking to store their baby’s blood, there is a high possibility that the blood won’t be a match for the occurring condition. In that event, the family would have to seek out a donor for a disease that is not successfully treatable by their stored cord blood. Unfortunately for these families, they are investing in a possibility. Many believe this is unethical.
Banking a baby’s blood and stem cells in a cord blood bank is a type of insurance. Ideally, you would not need to access your baby’s stem cells in order to address a medical concern. However, using a cord blood bank can provide peace of mind in knowing that you have a valuable resource if you need it.
If your newborn’s brother or sister has a condition treatable by cord blood there is an option for you to urgently store the cord blood free of cost. Public banks such as Texas Cord Blood Bank covers transplants for siblings only.
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A third option, sometimes not known about, is available for cord blood banking as well. A direct donation bank is a combination of private and public banks. These banks will store blood for public use, but accept donations that can be reserved for families or specific individuals. Some do not charge a fee for this service, while others may offer a reduced fee compared to banks that are completely private.
Cord blood is collected by your obstetrician or the staff at the hospital where you give birth. Not all hospitals offer this service. Some charge a separate fee that may or may not be covered by insurance.
Your baby’s cord blood could be a valuable resource for another family.  From foundations to non-profit blood banks and medical facilities, there are numerous locations that will collect, process, and use the stem cells from your baby’s cord blood to treat other people.
The next step at either a public or family bank is to process the cord blood to separate the blood component holding stem cells. The final product has a volume of 25 milliliters and includes a cryoprotectant which prevents the cells from bursting when frozen. Typical cost, $250 to $300 per unit.
At Cryo-Cell, we strive to give all parents the chance to store their babies’ umbilical cord blood for the future health of their families. We offer special discounts and offers for multiple births, returning customers, referrals, military families, medical professionals, long-term, pre-paid storage plans and more. In addition, we have in-house financing options that start for as little as a few dollars a day to keep cord blood banking in everyone’s reach. See how much cord blood banking costs at Cryo-Cell here.
One of the questions that all new mothers are asked during their pregnancy is if they wish to bank their cord blood after the delivery. The cord blood has stem cells within it, which in the ever-evolving field of medicine today allows for improved transplants, immune systems, and injury recovery… but they could also be used to save your child’s life one day. At birth, these stem cells are unique, smart, and extremely flexible and at this very moment are being used to treat over 80 diseases.
Many expectant parents would love the opportunity to bank their baby’s cord blood and cord tissue, but with an initial fee of $1600–$1800 for a quality service and an annual fee of $150–$175, the cost of banking cord blood may seem out of reach. At Cryo-Cell, we are committed to offering a high standard of service at the best price possible, with absolutely no unexpected fees or hidden surcharges. To help keep cord blood banking in everyone’s budget, we offer in-house financing options that begin for as little as $199 down and $128 per month. In addition, we regularly offer specials and have a number of discounts for current clients, referrals, multiple birthes and medical professionals. We will even meet the price of any reputable competitor through our best-price guarantee.
FAQ172: Designed as an aid to patients, this document sets forth current information and opinions related to women’s health. The information does not dictate an exclusive course of treatment or procedure to be followed and should not be construed as excluding other acceptable methods of practice. Variations, taking into account the needs of the individual patient, resources, and limitations unique to the institution or type of practice, may be appropriate.
Shai was a feisty little girl whose mother used her scientific background to search for the best approach to cure her cancer. Shai narrowly escaped death many times, including a recovery that even her doctors considered a miracle, yet she died at dawn on the day that she would have begun kindergarten. Her mother went on to found this website and charity in her memory. Read more…
The use of cord blood is determined by the treating physician and is influenced by many factors, including the patient’s medical condition, the characteristics of the sample, and whether the cord blood should come from the patient or an appropriately matched donor. Cord blood has established uses in transplant medicine; however, its use in regenerative medicine is still being researched. There is no guarantee that treatments being studied in the laboratory, clinical trials, or other experimental treatments will be available in the future.
Most public banks only work with selected hospitals in their community. They do this because they need to train the staff who will collect the cord blood, and they want the blood to be transported to their laboratory as quickly as possible. A parent who wants to donate should start by finding public banks in your country.
The mother signs an informed consent which gives a “public” cord blood bank permission to collect the cord blood after birth and to list it on a database that can be searched by doctors on behalf of patients.  The cord blood is listed purely by its genetic type, with no information about the identity of the donor. In the United States, Be The Match maintains a national network of public cord blood banks and registered cord blood donations. However, all the donation registries around the world cooperate with each other, so that a patient who one day benefits from your child’s cord blood may come from anywhere. It is truly a gift to the benefit of humankind.
If you can afford the costs of cord blood banking, then it makes sense to have it done to protect against the “what ifs” of life. If you cannot, you can still potentially help someone in need by making a donation to a public cord blood bank, which is often free and may just have a small collection fee from the hospital. The world of medicine is changing, which is why cord blood banking is so important. Talk to your doctor today to see if it is something you should be doing!





When you bank your child’s cord blood with ViaCord, your child will have access to stem cells that are a perfect genetic match.  Some cancers like neuroblastoma are autologous treatments. Ongoing regenerative medicine clinical trials are using a child’s own stem cells for conditions like autism and cerebral palsy. 104, 109 To date, of the 400+ families that have used their cord blood 44% were for regenerative medicine research.
If someone doesn’t have cord blood stored, they will have to rely on stem cells from another source. For that, we can go back to the history of cord blood, which really begins with bone marrow. Bone marrow contains similar although less effective and possibly tainted versions of the same stem cells abundant in cord blood. Scientists performed the first bone marrow stem cell transplant in 1956 between identical twins. It resulted in the complete remission of the one twin’s leukemia.
For these and other reasons, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and many physicians do not recommend private cord blood banking except as “directed donations” in cases where a family member already has a current need or a very high potential risk of needing a bone marrow transplant. In all other cases, the AAP has declared the use of cord blood as “biological insurance” to be “unwise.” [Read the AAP’s news release at http://www.aap.org/advocacy/archives/julcord.htm ]
Because of the genetic similarities of siblings, cord blood from one child can be used to treat certain medical conditions from which another child may be suffering. Banking cord blood privately in such a circumstance is highly recommended if the parents can afford the collection and storage costs because it could be useful in finding a cure for the other family member.
Donors to public banks must be screened for blood or immune system disorders or other problems. With a cord blood donation, the mother’s blood is tested for genetic disorders and infections, and the cord blood also is tested after it is collected. Once it arrives at the blood bank, the cord blood is “typed.” It is tracked by a computer so that it can be found quickly for any person who matches when needed.
As cord blood is inter-related to cord blood banking, it is often a catch-all term used for the various cells that are stored. It may be surprising for some parents to learn that stored cord blood contains little of what people think of as “blood,” as the red blood cells (RBCs) can actually be detrimental to a cord blood treatment. (As we’ll discuss later, one of the chief goals of cord blood processing is to greatly reduce the volume of red blood cells in any cord blood collection.)
The stored blood can’t always be used, even if the person develops a disease later on, because if the disease was caused by a genetic mutation, it would also be in the stem cells. Current research says the stored blood may only be useful for 15 years.
There are around 30 private banks in the U.S. too. If you decide to opt for private storage, you should choose a cord blood bank that’s registered with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and accredited by the American Association of Blood Banks (AABB). AABB accreditation is the gold standard in cord blood banking, ensuring that your baby’s cord blood is collected, stored, processed and distributed safely and effectively.
These powerful cells play an important role in treating many life-threatening diseases. They can help someone who is sick and in need of a stem transplant now or in the near future. They could also help your child or another member of your family if they get sick later on. How the cells are used depends on the cord blood banking method you choose.
Public cord blood banks store cord blood for allogenic transplants. They do not charge to store cord blood. The stem cells in the donated cord blood can be used by anyone who matches. Some public banks will store cord blood for directed donation if you have a family member who has a disease that could potentially be treated with stem cells.
The potential of cord blood banking is enormous, but so are the costs of private banking. The pros and cons of cord blood banking suggest that public banking can be a beneficial choice for many families. Other choices are available as well, including a delay in the cutting of the umbilical cord, so each family must decide which option will be right for them.
This is only the beginning. Newborn stem cell research is advancing, and may yield discoveries that could have important benefits for families. CBR’s mission is to support the advancement of newborn stem cell research, with the hope that the investment you are making now will be valuable to your family in the future. CBR offers a high quality newborn stem cell preservation system to protect these precious resources for future possible benefits for your family.
Each cord blood bank has different directions for returning the consent form. Some banks may ask you to mail the consent form along with the health history forms or to bring the original consent form with you to the hospital. Other banks may have you finish the form at the hospital. Follow the directions from your public cord blood bank.
Some cord banks require the umbilical cord to be cut after one minute, when the recommended time for delayed cord clamping is a minimum of two minutes. Ideally a baby can receive his or her full volume of blood – the cord blood can account for around one third of the baby’s blood volume, which is significant.
Cord blood is easier to match than blood stem cells from other parts of the body. Cells from cord blood are also less mature than cells from an adult’s bone marrow, so the recipient’s body is less likely to reject them.
Most cells can make copies only of themselves. For example, a skin cell only can make another skin cell. Hematopoietic stem cells, however, can mature into different types of blood cells in the body. Hematopoietic stem cells also are found in blood and bone marrow in adults and children.
Why should you consider donating the cord blood to a public bank? Simply because, besides bringing a new life into the world, you could be saving an individual whose best chance at life is a stem cell transplant with your baby’s donated cord blood. This can only happen if you donate and if your baby is a close enough match for a patient in need. If you chose to reserve the cord blood for your family, then siblings who have the same parents have a 25% chance of being an exact match.

One Reply to “cord blood facts | babies need their cord blood”

  1. You’ve just visited the doctor and the good news is that you’re going to have a baby and everything looks good. Thirty years ago, your doctor may have given you a baby book and information about products that sponsors want you to buy for your new addition. Today, along with pretty much the same materials, you’ll be asked to consider saving the blood of your newborn that’s left over in the umbilical cord and placenta after the delivery. Another big decision, and possibly a costly one.
    Current applications for newborn stem cells include treatments for certain cancers and blood, metabolic and immune disorders. Additionally, newborn stem cell preservation has a great potential to benefit the newborn’s immediate family members with stem cell samples preserved in their most pristine state.
    ‡ Payment Plan Disclosures for in-house CBR 6-Month Plan (interest free) – No credit check required. The 6-month plan requires a $10/month administrative fee. The plans may be prepaid in full at any time.
    One of the primary reasons why parents are choosing to bank cord blood is because of a history of family illness. Everything from metabolic disorders to immune system problems to common childhood cancers are all being treated with cord blood stem cells, making them an invaluable resource for your family.
    The stored blood can’t always be used, even if the person develops a disease later on, because if the disease was caused by a genetic mutation, it would also be in the stem cells. Current research says the stored blood may only be useful for 15 years.

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