how much cord blood is collected | cover letter for a cord blood tech

For example, if your baby were born with a genetic condition, such as spina bifida, her stem cells would carry this condition as well and therefore couldn’t be used to treat her. Similarly with leukemia, the stem cells may already have pre-leukemic changes.
Your baby’s umbilical cord blood has the power to heal life-threatening diseases such as leukemia, lymphomas, and sickle cell anemia. The stem cells in the baby’s blood are immature cells that can reproduce themselves as well as provide the potential to turn into other types of cells, thereby eliminating the disease itself.
Cord blood banking has become more popular over the last few years. And at some point or another, you may have noticed information about it at your doctor’s office. But what is it, exactly — and is it something you should do?
If you do decide to bank your baby’s cord blood, there’s one more thing to keep in mind: It’s best not to make it a last-minute decision. You should coordinate with the bank before your baby is born so nothing is left to chance.
Cord blood contains all the same components as normal blood, including red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets and plasma. What makes it special is that it’s also rich in hematopoietic stem cells — special blood-forming stem cells that are similar to those found in bone marrow. These cells can be used to treat many types of diseases.
Current research suggests that cord blood can be stored for a maximum of 15 years. New technologies in this field may extend that timeframe in the future, but how that would affect current samples stored is unknown. Because of these limits, several organizations, including the American Academy of Pediatrics, recommend against routine cord blood storage and suggest public banking instead.
As with any medical procedure, there is never a 100% guarantee that banked cord blood, even if it comes from the patient being treated, will provide a successful outcome. Families can go through the entire cost of banking cord blood, including the massive first-year fee, only to find that the treatment didn’t work as intended. It is not an investment. It is more of an insurance policy.
Both AAP and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists have discouraged private storage as “biological insurance” in most other cases. For some blood cancers and other blood diseases, such as leukemia, a person’s own blood could most likely not be used for treatment—their stem cells would have the same mutation that caused the disease.
This web page was researched by Frances Verter, PhD, Alexey Bersenev, MD PhD, and Pedro Silva Couto, MSc ©2016-2018. Sources of information about established therapies were publications in the medical literature found via PubMed and Google Scholar. Sources of clinical trials were searches of ClinicalTrials.gov, Chinese Clinical Trial Registry (ChiCTR), Japan University hospital Medical Information Network Clinical Trial Registry (UMIN-CTR), Japan Medical Association Clinical Trial Registry (JMA-CTR), Clinical Research Information Service from South Korea (CRiS), EU Clinical Trials Register (EudraCT), World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP), Netherlands Trial Register (NTR), Australian New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry (ANZCTR), Clinical Trials Registry-India (CTRI), German Clinical Trials Register (DRKS), and Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials (IRCT).
The primary disadvantage of cord blood banking is that it isn’t a cheap procedure and many families may not be able to afford it. The initial cost of saving your cord blood for personal use can be upwards of $2,500. There are annual storage fees, sometimes as high as $200, that must be paid as well. It is free, however, to donate blood to a public cord blood bank.
Most of the diseases on the proven treatment list are inherited genetic diseases. Typically, these treatments require a donor transplant, as from a sibling. In fact, research shows that treatments using cord blood from a family member are about twice as successful as treatments using cord blood from a non-relative.9a, 17 To date, over 400 ViaCord families have used their cord blood 56% were for transplant.1
Your child may never need it. Stem cell-rich cord blood can be used to treat a range of diseases, but Frances Verter, Ph.D., founder and director of Parent’s Guide to Cord Blood Foundation, estimates that there’s only a 1 in 217 chance that your child will ever need a stem cell transplant with cord blood (or bone marrow). This is particularly true if the child doesn’t have a family history of diseases such as leukemia, lymphoma, or sickle cell anemia. Although the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) states cord blood has been used to treat certain diseases successfully, there isn’t strong evidence to support cord blood banking. If a family does choose to bank cord blood, the AAP recommends public cord blood banking (instead of private) to cut down on expenditures.
Donating cord blood to a public cord blood bank involves talking with your doctor or midwife about your decision to donate and then calling a cord blood bank (if donation can be done at your hospital). Upon arriving at the hospital, tell the labor and delivery nurse that you are donating umbilical cord blood.
Families must pay the annual storage fees to maintain their cord blood at a private bank. If those fees are not paid, then the cord blood will simply be disposed of or donated to a public bank. That is why public cord blood banks can be a better option, especially for households with lower income levels, because there is a greater chance that the stored blood will be able to successfully treat someone in the future.





The benefits for low risk families with no known history or immune or blood disorders are not clear. Unless you have a family member with a medical condition that might be helped by a stem-cell transplant, associations such as the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) advise against cord blood storage in private bank facilities, because of the cost.
Now that you know the cord blood banking pros and cons, there really isn’t a right or wrong thing to do. The question is simply – What’s right for your family? Reputable websites and testimonials are your saving grace if you’re on the fence for investing or even donating.
In addition, cord blood is being used in experimental therapies that can help with traumatic brain injuries, developed hearing loss, and other conditions that may be caused by an inherited disease. Because the future of cord blood research is rather unknown at this point, storing the blood makes sense because in a few years, that cord blood could make an immediate impact on someone’s health within the family.
In terms of performance, our PrepaCyte-CB processing method has taken the lead. PrepaCyte-CB greatly improves on parents’ returns on investment because it yields the highest number of stem cells while showing the greatest reduction in red blood cells.1–4 Clinical transplant data show that cord blood processed with PrepaCyte-CB engrafts more quickly than other processing methods.7 This means patients may start feeling better more quickly, may spend less time in the hospital and are less likely to suffer from an infection. The ability to get better more quickly and a reduced chance of infection can prove vital in certain cases. Learn more about PrepaCyte®-CB here.
The process used to collect cord blood is simple and painless. After the baby is born, the umbilical cord is cut and clamped. Blood is drawn from the cord with a needle that has a bag attached. The process takes about 10 minutes.
What stroller should I register for? How will I find a good pediatrician? And will I ever settle on color for the nursery? There are so many things to think about before your baby is born. But here’s one more decision you might want to consider: whether to bank your baby’s cord blood.
The term “cord blood” is used for the blood remaining in the umbilical cord and the placenta after the birth of a baby. Cord Blood contains stem cells that can grow into blood and immune system cells, as well as other types of cells. Today cord blood is often used as a substitute for bone marrow in stem cell transplants. There are over 80 diseases treated this way, including cancers, blood disorders, genetic and metabolic diseases.
Cord blood is easier to match than blood stem cells from other parts of the body. Cells from cord blood are also less mature than cells from an adult’s bone marrow, so the recipient’s body is less likely to reject them.
From the What to Expect editorial team and Heidi Murkoff, author of What to Expect When You’re Expecting. Health information on this site is based on peer-reviewed medical journals and highly respected health organizations and institutions including ACOG (American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists), CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) and AAP (American Academy of Pediatrics), as well as the What to Expect books by Heidi Murkoff.
Most public banks only work with selected hospitals in their community. They do this because they need to train the staff who will collect the cord blood, and they want the blood to be transported to their laboratory as quickly as possible. A parent who wants to donate should start by finding public banks in your country.
All families should decide what they want to do with their cord blood well before delivery and make the arrangements accordingly. Because the issue is complex and the decision is a personal one—it’s best to speak with your doctor about what’s right for your family.
Cord tissue is rich in a completely different type of stem cell. With over fifty clinical trials currently in progress, researchers agree that banking cord tissue is the future of stem cell banking. Learn more >
Whole genome sequencing is the process of mapping out the entire DNA sequence of a person’s genome. This test can show what type of health concerns we might face and most importantly how we can improve our health and quality of life.
Sign a consent form to donate. This consent form says that the donated cord blood may be used by any patient needing a transplant. If the cord blood cannot be used for transplantation, it may be used in research studies or thrown away. These studies help future patients have a more successful transplant.
The entire procedure is noninvasive, painless and does not interfere with the birthing process. If at any time your physician or midwife becomes concerned about the health of you or your baby, the cord blood collection will not take place.
The materials and information included in this electronic newsletter (Newsletter), including advertisements, are provided as a service to you and do not reflect endorsement by the Parent’s Guide to Cord Blood Foundation (the “Foundation”). The Foundation is not responsible for the accuracy and completeness of information provided by guest authors, outside sources, or on websites linked to the Newsletter. The Foundation reserves the right at any time to remove materials and information from the Newsletter without communication with the author or organization. Access to and use of all Newsletter information is at the user’s own risk. The Foundation is not liable for any damages of any kind, nature or description (whether direct, consequential or punitive) arising out of or relating to information referenced in the Newsletter, or related in any way to the user’s access to the Newsletter. The Foundation’s Terms of Use is expressly incorporated herein. Questions can be directed to info@parentsguidecordblood.org.
Prior to freezing the cells, samples are taken for quality testing. Banks measure the number of cells that are positive for the CD34 marker, a protein that is used to estimate the number of blood-forming stem cells present. Typical cost, $150 to $200 per unit. They also measure the number of nucleated cells, another measure of stem cells, both before and after processing to determine the cell recovery rate. Typical expense, $35 per unit. A portion of the sample is submitted to check that there is no bacterial or fungal contamination. Typical expense, $75 per unit. Public banks will also check the ability of the sample to grow new cells by taking a culture called the CFU assay. Typical expense, $200 to $250 per unit.
When all the processing and testing is complete, the cord blood stem cells are frozen in cryogenic nitrogen freezers at -196° C until they are requested for patient therapy. Public banks are required to complete the entire laboratory processing and freeze the cord blood stem cells within 48 hours of collection. This is to insure the highest level of stem cell viability. The accreditation agencies allow family banks a window of 72 hours.
Meet Dylan. Diagnosed with leukemia at just 8 weeks old, he received a life-saving cord blood transplant at 6 months old. Today, Dylan is growing up strong, going to school, travelling with his family and just having fun being a kid!
Checked to make sure it has enough blood-forming cells for a transplant. (If there are too few cells, the cord blood unit may be used for research to improve the transplant process for future patients or to investigate new therapies using cord blood, or discarded.)
Once cord blood is in a public bank, it is listed as available on a national registry. People who need stem cell transplants and are looking for a match may be able to use it. In 2016, cord blood was used to help 29% of patients who received a transplant in the US, according to the HRSA.
## Payment Plan Disclosures for in-house CBR 12-Month Plan (interest free) – No credit check required. The 12-month plan requires a $15/month administrative fee. The plans may be prepaid in full at any time.
* Annual storage fees will be charged automatically to the credit/debit card on file, on or around your baby’s birthday, unless you’ve chosen a prepay option and are subject to change until they are paid.
Cord blood is the blood that remains in the umbilical cord and placenta following birth. This blood is usually discarded. However, cord blood banking utilizes facilities to store and preserve a baby’s cord blood. If you are considering storing your baby’s cord blood, make sure to use a cord blood bank accredited by the American Association of Blood Banks (AABB), like Viacord.
We offer standard and premium cord blood processing options. Our standard service has been used in thousands of successful transplants since 1988 and begins at $1600. For $350 more, our premium service uses a superior new processing method that greatly enhances parents’ return on investment. (Please visit our processing technology page to learn about our cord blood processing methods.) For an additional $950, you can also store your baby’s cord tissue, which has the potential to help heal the body in different ways than cord blood.
After all is said and done, the cost to collect, test, process and store a donated cord blood collection at a public bank is estimated to be $1,200 to $1,500 dollars for each unit banked. That does not include the expense for the regulatory and quality systems needed to maintain licensure, or the cost of collecting units that are discarded because they don’t meet standards.

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