what does cord blood cure | cover letter for a cord blood tech

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The stem cells in cord blood can provide numerous benefits, but they are not a magical cure for everything that may happen to a child. Certain genetic conditions, such as MD or spina bifida, cannot be treated through a child’s cord blood because the stem cells would be affected by the same condition. Other cord blood options may be available, but it is important to note that the presence of it is not a guarantee of future wellness.
Banking cord blood is a new type of medical protection, and there are a lot of questions that parents may want to ask. The Parent’s Guide to Cord Blood organization even has questions it believes all parents should ask their cord blood banks. We have answers to these and other frequently asked cord blood questions in our FAQs. If you can’t find the answer for which you are looking, please feel free to engage one of our cord blood educators through the website’s chat interface.
Another primary issue is simply the fact that there is no guarantee that stem cells from cord blood will ever become a viable medical field. Though these stem cells are being used in current therapies, the chances of needing a specific stem cell transplant without a family history of illness or disease is quite low.
Private (commercial) cord banks will store the donated blood for use by the donor and family members only. They can be expensive. These banks charge a fee for processing and an annual fee for storage.
Stem cells are able to transform into other types of cells in the body to create new growth and development. They are also the building blocks of the immune system. The transformation of these cells provides doctors with a way to treat leukemia and some inherited health disorders.
Our annual storage fee is due every year on the birth date of the child and covers the cost of storage until the following birthday. The fee is the same $150 for both our standard and our premium cord blood services. The annual cord tissue storage fee is an additional $150.
If someone doesn’t have cord blood stored, they will have to rely on stem cells from another source. For that, we can go back to the history of cord blood, which really begins with bone marrow. Bone marrow contains similar although less effective and possibly tainted versions of the same stem cells abundant in cord blood. Scientists performed the first bone marrow stem cell transplant in 1956 between identical twins. It resulted in the complete remission of the one twin’s leukemia.
Cord blood is rich in special hematopoietic stem cells that aren’t found in blood from other parts of the body. Most cells are only able to make copies of themselves. (For instance, eye cells can only make copies of cells found in the eyes.) But these cord blood stem cells are different. Because they haven’t fully matured, they’re able to develop into different types of blood and immune-system cells.
The collection of cord blood takes place after the baby has been delivered, so there is no risk to either the mother or baby. The delivery process is not changed or modified because of the cord blood collection. The umbilical cord is clamped, cut and separated from the baby. The baby is then placed in the mother’s arms or taken to a warmer. Only then will your physician or midwife collect the cord blood. The blood from the umbilical cord drains into a standard blood donor collection bag by gravity.
Fortunately, there are financial aid options for those who are looking to store cord blood for a family member with a condition that can be treated by stem cells. According to cordbloodbanking.com, “banks will pay for the processing, shipment and storage fees using donations for partnering charity organizations.
Students who register to donate blood three or more times during their high school career earn a Red Cord to wear during graduation events. Seniors must complete the requirement by May 15 (or by the date of their school’s final blood drive of the year, whichever is later).  
Cord tissue is rich in another type of stem cell. Although there are no current uses, researchers are excited about the benefits cord tissue stem cells may offer in potential future users, such as regenerative medicine. By storing both, you’ll have potential access to more possibilities





Families must pay the annual storage fees to maintain their cord blood at a private bank. If those fees are not paid, then the cord blood will simply be disposed of or donated to a public bank. That is why public cord blood banks can be a better option, especially for households with lower income levels, because there is a greater chance that the stored blood will be able to successfully treat someone in the future.
Currently, cord blood can only treat blood and immune diseases. There is research being done into other ways of using cord blood, such as in the treatment of diabetes, Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s disease, but there is no conclusive evidence this research will lead to effective treatments.
The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends families choose to donate their cord blood to public banks in most cases. Private banking should be considered for family use where there is a full sibling in the family with a condition that could potentially benefit from a transplant as siblings have a 25% chance of being a match.
Chloe Savannah Metz’ mother donated her baby girl’s cord blood to the NCBP in December 2000. “Many thanks to the New York Blood Center for giving us the opportunity to donate our cord — we hope to give someone a second chance!” – Christine Metz
Luckily for expectant parents, cord blood can be easily collected at the baby’s birth via the umbilical cord with no harm to the mother or baby. This is why pregnancy is a great time to plan to collect and bank a baby’s cord blood.
There are around 30 private banks in the U.S. too. If you decide to opt for private storage, you should choose a cord blood bank that’s registered with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and accredited by the American Association of Blood Banks (AABB). AABB accreditation is the gold standard in cord blood banking, ensuring that your baby’s cord blood is collected, stored, processed and distributed safely and effectively.
Cord blood is collected by your obstetrician or the staff at the hospital where you give birth. Not all hospitals offer this service. Some charge a separate fee that may or may not be covered by insurance.
​nbiased and factual information. The Foundation educates parents, health professionals and the general public about the need to preserve this valuable medical resource while providing information on both public cord blood donation programs and private family cord blood banks worldwide. Learn more about our global community.
Stem cells from cord blood can be given to more people than those from bone marrow. More matches are possible when a cord blood transplant is used than when a bone marrow transplant is used. In addition, the stem cells in cord blood are less likely to cause rejection than those in bone marrow.
Families expecting a new baby face hundreds of decisions that will affect their child’s future—like finding the perfect name, figuring how to manage breast or bottle feeding, childcare, and a host of other parenting decisions.
For many families, the primary reason why they choose not to store their cord blood is the overall cost of doing so. You only get one chance to store the cord blood and the cost of collection, storage, and shipping for the first year alone is often the same price as delivering the baby at the hospital. It is not uncommon for costs to be around $2,000 for the initial collection, than there is often a storage fee of over $100 per year that must also be paid.
Cord blood has an abundance of stem cells and immune system cells, and the medical uses of these cells has been expanding at a rapid pace. As these cells help the body re-generate tissues and systems, cord blood is often referred to as a regenerative medicine.
With more than 80 diseases now treatable using cord blood stem cells and over 50 clinical trials underway using cord and placenta tissue, the motivation for collecting these valuable and potentially life-saving cells is clear. When you save these stem cells with Americord®, you ensure that they are securely stored for you and your family’s future needs.
Cord blood banking means preserving the newborn stem cells found in the blood of the umbilical cord and the placenta. After a baby is born, and even after delayed cord clamping, there is blood remaining in the umbilical cord and placenta that holds valuable newborn stem cells. Parents have a choice between donating cord blood to a public bank for free, or paying to store it for their family in a private bank. Cord blood banking includes the whole process from collection through storage of newborn stem cells for future medical purposes.
Your baby’s newborn stem cells are transported to our banking facilities by our medical courier partner, and you can receive tracking updates. Each sample is processed and stored with great care at our laboratory in Tucson, Arizona. CBR’s Quality Standard means we test every cord blood sample for specific quality metrics.
Cord blood is a source of adult stem cells similar to those contained in bone marrow. Cord blood stem cells are collected after the birth of a healthy infant, and pose no risk to the donating mother or baby. Therefore, there are no ethical issues or controversy connected with the use of these cells. This differs from controversial embryonic stem cells that require the destruction of an embryo in order to be used for research.
Banking a baby’s blood and stem cells in a cord blood bank is a type of insurance. Ideally, you would not need to access your baby’s stem cells in order to address a medical concern. However, using a cord blood bank can provide peace of mind in knowing that you have a valuable resource if you need it.

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